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New Hampshire Hospital Association Releases New Report on the New Hampshire Health Protection Plan:

Data Shows Continued Reductions in Hospital Use Among Uninsured

 

Concord, NH - The New Hampshire Hospital Association (NHHA) released a report today showing that the New Hampshire Health Protection Plan (NHHPP) continues to have a positive impact on patients, families and the overall healthcare system. 

Since the New Hampshire Health Protection Plan was created in August 2014, data reported to the NHHA by its member hospitals has continued to show reductions in the number of uninsured patients seeking care from New Hampshire’s hospitals.   In fact, as of June 2015, emergency department visits among the uninsured are down 28%, inpatient visits among the uninsured are down 36%, and outpatient visits among the uninsured are down 23% compared to the prior year.  

“More than 41,000 low-income Granite State residents now have health insurance coverage and, therefore, access to routine, preventive care –  the right care, at the right place, at the right time,” said NHHA President Steve Ahnen.  “This reduces the overall cost of care, and it also means the cost of care,  previously shifted to New Hampshire citizens and businesses, is now mainly subsidized by the federal government.“

The NHHA also reported reductions in the amount of uncompensated care provided by hospitals across New Hampshire.  This is an important trend that is helping to reduce the hidden tax that gets shifted to insured citizens and businesses through higher costs and higher health insurance premiums.  As a result of this drop in uncompensated care, these costs have been substantially reduced, resulting in less pressure on health insurance premiums.

The New Hampshire Health Protection Plan is currently slated to sunset by the end of 2016, which would mean the loss of $400-500 million a year in federal investments in New Hampshire health care.  The New Hampshire Hospital Association believes that reauthorization of the NHHPP is imperative to continue the important gains that have been made over the past year to increase access for Granite State residents to the type of primary, preventive care that keeps them healthy, decrease the amount of uncompensated care provided by hospitals, health centers, doctors and others, and reduce cost shifting and hidden taxes.

 “The costs of caring for these 41,000 people do not go away if the NHHPP expires,” added Ahnen.  “It simply means that the positive gains we have seen over the past year will be reversed and the costs of caring for those without insurance will get transferred right back to New Hampshire citizens and businesses.”

The Association’s full report can be found here